Solar CDX

The Crossed Bananas Display

orthagonalArguably, the crossed bananas display (CBD) was not the next most needed accessory in my shack. I mean, who needs a crossed bananas display, anyhow? Nonetheless, I built one, and it seems to be working.

The CBD is a tuning aid for frequency-shift keyed modes. At one time, these displays were particularly in vogue among RTTY operators. The original version made use of an XY-mode analogue oscilloscope. The demodulated sound from the radio was filtered at the mark and space frequencies and each signal was then fed to either the X or Y input of the scope. Ideally, the tones would be sine waves, and when one tone would be sent, the other would be off. Each tone corresponds to a “banana” or oval on the XY display. The oval is horizontal for one tone and vertical for the other. When the radio is perfectly tuned, the two tones are located right on the two filter center frequencies. When a RTTY signal is sent, or even while it is idling, there is rapid alternation between the two tones, so the vertical and horizontal ovals appear so quickly that they appear to overlap, hence crossed bananas. When the radio is a bit off frequency, the phase relationship changes and the traced ovals rotate and distort. When only noise is present, the tracing is a random jumble. It’s easier to see this in action than to describe it, so I made a video of how it looks on an oscilloscope and how it looks on my newly minted digital CBD.

I got thinking about RTTY and some other similar modes after working on the PK232 mentioned in earlier posts. The PK232 has a little bar graph that indicates when a signal is centered such that the mark and space tones fall where they should, be it for RTTY, AMTOR, PACTOR I, etc. A lot of the circuitry in the PK232 is dedicated to producing and sensing these tones and telling them apart from noise.  The bar graph tuning indicator is usable, but let’s face it, nowhere as cool looking as the old style crossed bananas displays on an oscilloscope.

My operating position is already cramped enough, though, without tossing an oscilloscope on the pile, plus I need my scope for bench work and don’t have an extra one that can just relax in a corner until it is needed for RTTY. No, what I needed was a small, modern version of the crossed bananas display.  This sounded like a good arduino project. The limiting factors would be timing of the audio samples and speed of updating the display.

My first thought for the display was an LED matrix, preferably one with minimal translational overhead. If the microcontroller could drive it directly or through a shift registers, that seemed like it would be lightning fast, and indeed it probably would be. Unfortunately, to get reasonable resolution, I’d probably need a pretty big array. 8×8 is chunky, but we’re already talking 64 LEDs.

schema_and_boardSo, with some concern about the data transfer and display/buffer update speeds, I took a look at some LCD displays. I found the ST7735R display at Adafruit. It’s 1.8 inches diagonally, with square pixels arranged in a 128 x 160 array. The display comes on a breakout board that makes it easy to work with, taking care of voltage conversion and making it an SPI device. The display includes a video buffer and Adafruit provides a library that abstracts most of the lower level functions. Adafruit also provides a general graphics library that provided methods for most of the things I wanted to do like drawing a pixel, erasing a pixel, writing text, blanking the screen, etc.

The sound coming out of the PK232 turned out to be biased around 7.5V, with swings of +/- 1.25 and 1.5 volts depending on whether it was being driven by the ACC output of my Yaesu FT-817 or Kenwood TS-450, which must output different levels.  Each tone was capacitively coupled to an op-amp channel set up as an inverted amplifier with variable gain. A ganged potentiometer sets the gain between unity and 2x. I used an MC33204PG quad op amp. Of the op-amps I had on hand, it was the best single voltage nearly rail-to-rail chip. I used the third section of the op amp configured as a voltage follower to set the bias voltage at 2.5V for the mark and space op amp sections, so only one out of the four op amp sections was left to twiddle its thumbs. With that bias and  input range, the output of the op amp would stay in a reasonable range, nearly 0-5V, consistent with the requirements for analog input on the ATmega328.

In principle, the XY display plots a point defined by an X-input and Y-input at a single instant, so one concern I had was that there had to be minimal separation between the mark and space voltage reads. I minimized this interval by setting the ADC prescaler to 16, trading off some accuracy for faster acquisition time. Without this tweak, the display was distorted due to delay artifact in the phase relationship of the two inputs.

naked_board back_of_board
Front and back view of the innards of the crossed-banana display

After displaying the self-congratulatory splash screen, the main activity is to read an XY pair, scale it, and plot it.  Given the speed of this process, more than one pixel needs to be displayed at a time to create a reasonably bright display. The solution is to use a circular buffer and to draw one pixel, erase the next pixel in the queue, and crank the index forward by one. This only gets complicated if the size of the queue varies arbitrarily, which is exactly what happens if you twist the brightness potentiometer. The brightness pot is polled every now and then, and when its value changes enough, the size of the queue is modified up or down, resulting in more or less pixels displayed at any one time, and giving the impression of brighter or darker display. When this happens, the size of the queue changes, so there is some housekeeping to do to make sure that all the pixels are taken care of.

The design has one more control, but it’s inside the box in the finished project. The LCD display has a huge range of colors, but having a rainbow XY display was not appealing. I incorporated a dip-switch on the control board, with three bits dedicated to color selection and one to choosing black versus white background. I didn’t think color would be adjusted frequently, so I though it would be okay to leave this control off the front panel. I set my CBD to green dots on a black background, as close as I could get to the appearance of a classic oscilloscope.

chassic_back chassis_front
The aluminum box, before painting, decals, etc.

My metal working facilities are limited, so this project went into the same sort of enclosure as the NEScafe filter, a cast-aluminum bud box. I bought these in bulk to save shipping at one point, so I suppose we’ll be seeing more of them in future projects as well.  At first, it seemed that this box was way too large for this project, but when I started thinking about all the items in the project (LCD panel, control board, two pots, two RCA jacks, a switch, power pole connectors), I became concerned that it all might not fit.

Since I don’t have the patience to send away to an offshore fab facility for a one-off PC board (and since it would likely take more more than one to get it right), I laid the project out on vector board, with some forethought to how it would mount in the bud box and where the screen, controls, and various connectors would emerge. To fit everything in, I had to pack components tightly and cut out two notches in the board to clear wiring runs.  Once again, small nylon spacers from Ace Hardware were my friend, providing stand-offs for the screen and for the control board. A layer of clear plastic provides some protection for the glass LCD display. The plastic is pinned at four corners by the control board stand-off screws, but also held in place with some double-face tape.

top_inside rear_inside
Contents stuffed into the box.

Since every project justifies one hardware purchase, my purchase for this project was a manual screw countersink from Carr-McMaster. It allowed me to use screws on the front panel, but have them flush with the surface of the panel.

The square window for the LCD was roughly cut out with a dremel rotary tool and then carefully finished with a flat file. The rest of the holes were made with a stepped drill bit, except the power pole hole on the back which I made by pin-holing the metal with a bunch of drill holes, widening with a nibbler, and finishing off with a small file.

I posted the code for this project, the schematic and picture of the vector board layout at https://code.google.com/p/crossed-bananas-display/.

 

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