Significant Other Update: Logic Board

For a few months, I’ve been playing working on a design for a QRP accessory as a way of becoming familiar with both the arduino platform and homebrewing technique. The basic idea was to put everything except a transceiver in one box, so I couldn’t leave anything behind when operating in the field. I wrote up a design overview when I started, and it is more or less up to date. The schematic isn’t necessarily finalized, but I’ve also posted the most recent version.

The first item I built was a relay board, with latching relays to route the signal through a bank of capacitors and inductors arranged in an L-network, configurable on the fly for low or high-Z. The prototype built on vector board  has nice blinky lights to help me visualize how the relays are switching. I’ve also built a power module and RF module (which senses SWR and reads frequency) on copper clad board.

Over the  New Year’s holiday break, I laid out the logic board, which contains the microprocessor (an ATmega368), a real time clock, LCD display, a piezo buzzer, some buttons, and connectors for paddle input and keyer output. The logic board also sports a USB interface to make my life simpler — I don’t think that will show up in the “final” version, which I envision being laid out as two PCBs: one for control, one for relays.  In the prototype, the two boards are joined by a ten-conductor ribbon cable (with RF connections through shielded cable, not added yet).

The two blank areas on the logic board are where the power module and RF module will be pasted in this prototype. For now, I’m leaving them off and concentrating on the programming aspect of the project. I’ve got some ideas about the global operation of the device and its menu structure, but before I really start any detailed coding, I’d like to look through a few similar projects. An obvious place to start is the full-featured CW keyer described by K3NG at http://radioartisan.wordpress.com/.  I can’t imagine putting all those features into this project, but I think I’ll learn a lot from reading through the code.

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