Significant Other Power Supply

Initially, I hadn’t given the power supply for the Significant Other project too much thought: I was more focused on the microcontroller, relays, and so on. After going for maximum efficiency with these components, though, it began to annoy me that it would be very wasteful to use an LM7805 regulator to bring lead acid battery voltage (13.8V) down to something that all the chips and relays could use (5V). The LM7805 tosses out the difference in heat, and while at the low currents that I need that doesn’t amount to much power — certainly, not enough to require heat sinks — it goes against the grain of QRP. If you have to haul a battery up a mountain, you’d like it to last as long as it can.

So, I started looking at more efficient (and lighter) means of powering the unit. The design I selected allows for two options. First, two AA batteries will fit inside the unit. Building them into the case assures that I can’t forget them. One of the goals of the SO project is to avoid unpleasant surprises while setting up the station in some remote location.  Since the unit draws so little current, I’d hope that a pair of AA batteries would last quite a while in field use.

Since radios are made to work from 13.8V sources, this is the other acceptable power input. The unit will be built with dual powerpole connectors, so that even if the battery has a single powerpole, it can be plugged into the unit, which effectively replicates the plug, so the radio can also be plugged into the unit. Even if the radio is greedy and pulls power from the battery causing the voltage to sag, the power regulator should cope with anything down to about 7.5V. If the lead acid battery gets that low, it’s probably toast anyhow.

Getting 5V from a 3V source requires a switching power supply, which could be a problem for a radio project since the switching happens at frequencies in the hundreds of kilohertz range. The LT1302-5 chip that I used in this project does not oscillate at a specific frequency, but is variable, and has the potential to produce RFI over a broad range of frequencies.

I followed the datasheet for the 1302 and built a “typical” supply using available parts. Layout is fairly critical, and I did my best to port their suggested PC board layout to manhattan construction. I didn’t have a 20k resistor, so I went with a 22k. I didn’t have any particularly low ESR electrolytics, so I used ones regular ones, etc. It seemed to work anyhow.

For testing purposes, I ran the power supply with a small load next to my FT-187nd, which was connected to a dummy load with cable that was unshielded for several centimeters. Within the ham bands, the only places I heard hash were on 160m and 80m, and even there, it only seemed to be around a couple frequencies. I had originally built the supply with a 10uH commercial inductor wound on a solid core. To limit EMI, I tried replacing this with an equivalent value hand-wound toroid (45 turns of 28Ga on a T50-2). This brought the noise level way down, and I couldn’t hear it when the antenna run was a couple cm away from the toroid. I suppose I could put the power supply in its own metal compartment, but it’s probably enough to just keep the RF path away from it in the layout.

Getting the right combination of bypass and charge-holding capacitors and discharge resistors is a bit empiric, and I’m not sure I did an optimal job, but I got out the voltage that I wanted. When connected to the oscilloscope, I noticed a periodic ~50mV spike that I thought could be a problem down the line for the microprocessor, so I borrowed a low pass filter from a similar project, the power supply in the Norcal 2030. I again had to substitute a bit — I think the filter inductors came out of an old TV. With that filter in place, the voltage is completely smooth as far as I can measure.

The two power supplies are connected by wire “OR”ing them together. The LT1302 senses 5V distal to a Schottky diode, but putting a diode after the higher power supply means that the voltage prior to its diode must be about 5.3 volts. To get that value, I used an LM317 and selected specific resistor values for its feedback network. The LM317 needs a small load to stabilize, so for the prototype, I threw in an indicator LED that lets me know when the high voltage supply is in use.

When the high power supply is active, it pulls up the LT1302 shutdown pin, which turns off the up-conversion. Without all that switching action, the voltage on the toroid side of the diode should be that of the AA batteries. This means that with the higher power supply active, the diode in the lower power supply is reverse biased and no current flows through it. This should mean that the unit can hot-switch between onboard and external power.

The prototype was a little smooshed because I had originally intended to only build the LT1302 circuit on that piece of copper clad board, and then I added the filter, and finally the 13.8V supply.

The real test of this supply will be whether it makes the other components happy.

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