QRP TTF 2013

For the 50th anniversary of the Vienna Wireless Society, the club operated under a special event call sign: W5O. As usual, there was a good turn out of club members for both the picnic and on-air activities. We put a couple rockmites, FT817s, and a KX3 on the air, and accumulated 62 contacts in our log in total running predominantly CW, but some phone as well. We had multiple contacts with other operators also participating in the QRP TTF, but also the Florida QSO Party, and one SOTA station. In the next couple weeks, we should send out our QSL cards to confirm the contacts.

untangleable1In the days before the event, I put together  an “untangleable folded dipole” antenna made from 300 ohm twinlead, plus a matching box comprised of two toroids and two capacitors. The antenna was based on a design found on the blog of KI6SN, and I summarized the construction details for my effort on a Google-plus post.

After spudgunning two trees, we hoisted the folded dipole to a flat 40-foot deployment. The feed line is about 25 feet, so a short BNC-terminated coax extension was used. The antenna worked great and allowed us to work a Swiss station, and to score reverse beacon hits throughout Europe on 20m.  I swept the antenna with a MFJ analyzer at the end of the event, and noted that SWR was below 1.2 for the entire CW portion of the band, and less than 2 from below 20m to above the voice portion of the band. So, quite impressed with the folded dipole design. As advertised, it packed up easily and without tangling.

untangle3

VAQP 2013

VAQP 2013 didn’t go quite the way I’d imagined it would, but it was still fun. Getting N1MM set up the night before the event, I was surprised to see fields for an exchange number. I’m pretty sure this was a new feature, and I’m not sure how popular it will be with people who prefer more casual operation in state QSO parties.

The contest ran from 10 am to 10 pm on Saturday and 8 am to 8 pm on Sunday. I spent Saturday with the Vienna Wireless Society, operating from the Annandale Swim Club. We got to the club at 9 am and it was probably unrealistic to think that we’d have antennas up, rigs configured, and N1MM networked by 10 am.

fishing for an antenna lineWe had some technical difficulties — our spud gun line broke a few times, the reels jammed, and trees claimed a lot of line and a few spuds. At one point, while I was working on another antenna placement, I noticed the other antenna hanging team trying to get one of our fouled lines out of a tree using the tools at hand: a lifeguard chair and a pool net.

It took a couple hours to get the antennas deployed. With the contest starting at 10 am, we started operating from the parking lot. I popped the tarheel antenna on my car, tuned to 40 meters, and Kevin WB0POH began working stations. By the time we had the indoor stations set up and configured, he had worked fifty contacts, including the bonus station, K4NVA.  I think all his contacts were CW, so worth twice the points to boot.

I’m not sure why, but we were not able to get the two logging computers to talk to each other. We tied them both into the club’s router, which should have worked like a hub. Both computers received DHCP addresses, and as far as I could tell, could see each other on the network. Not wanting to waste any more time, I set up the voice station to start with an exchange number of 500, while the CW station continued to build on Kevin’s earlier contacts. I’m sure hearing our SSB exchanges in the 500 range early in the day put the fear of god into our more competitive neighboring clubs. Heh.

The CW station was set up in a different room from the SSB station, and we had a counter and some stools as operating space. After sitting for a while, I got rid of the stool and used the counter as a standing desk. It felt good to dance around while working CW, and I think I might try for this sort of set up in the future as it keeps the blood flowing. Ian, N0IMB, took some video of TS-450 I was using. Unfortunately, the video does not capture my dance moves.  You can’t  hear the dits and dahs on the video because I’m wearing headphones.

We broke down our field stations and took down the antennas on Saturday night. The next morning, I set the home station up again. I had brought a number of station items to the field, so I had a little rewiring to do before I could get on the air Sunday morning at around 11 am.  I worked intermittently until the end of the contest at 8pm that evening, but had a number of fairly large breaks to take care of family, do chores, etc. I entered as single-op, all bands, low power (100W), CW-only, non-assisted, one radio.

Propagation was so-so, and I kept hoping that after a break, it would improve. It wasn’t just my imagination: conditions were much better on Saturday. Looking at the space weather data, a CME thrown on Friday hit the ionosphere Sunday morning, just when I was starting operation. The K-index bumped up to five and stayed there the rest of the day. Conditions did seem to improve as the day went on, but this perception may also be a matter of more people joining the contest for the last few hours.

I spent almost all of my time on 40m, using the attic dipole rather than the outside 40m vertical that does better in DX contests. I had good coverage of New England earlier in the day, and worked westward into Wisconsin, Kentucky, and Arkansas. Operating NVIS, I had a reasonable chance of operating other VA stations, including VWS club member Kevin, WB0POH.

Twenty meters was not as helpful as I’d have liked — at one point, Europe opened somewhat, and I worked a succession of stations in Poland, Germany and  the Slovak Republic. Later in the day, I had a brief opening to the west coast: WA, OR, and CA. Otherwise, 20m was my direct line to Florida. I did reach two stations on ten meters, but probably ground wave.

In the last hour and a half, I did good business on 80m, where I mostly ran into stations that I had worked on other bands.

I was surprised in the contest how many times I was called by stations that I had already worked. As a matter of course, I worked them again.  Maybe conditions were marginal on some of those calls, and maybe they just wanted an insurance contact. I didn’t hear anyone else operating from Fairfax City (FXX) — at least not on CW — so maybe my exchange was in high demand.

My final tally was 166 contacts (some dupes), with a paltry 26 Virginia City/County, 23 State/Province, and 3 DX entities. If I calculated correctly, I may have nosed over 20,000 points. Not a great performance, but not too bad considering time and conditions.

As for the club log, I’ll have to more or less manually merge the databases from the two workstations that we used into one file for submission to the Sterling Club which runs the VAQP.

Field Day CW Totals

We’re still assembling the total number of contacts from FD 2012 because the SSB and CW stations were not networked, but here are the totals for the two CW stations. I’d say we hit our goals and then some.

 

The 80/20/10 station

Mhz Contacts
3.5 279
7 304
21 15
Total 599

The 40/15 station

Mhz Contacts
7 430
21 115
28 4
50 1
Total 550

So, our CW total for the event was 1159 contacts. The results from the SSB, VHF/satellite, and GOTA stations and all bonus points should be out soon.

Field Day 2012

Ray, K2HYD at the operating position of the 80/20/10 tent. Hap, K7HAP is at the second position on the laptop, and Byron, W4SSY, supervises

To make everyone’s life easier, we stuck mostly to the plan developed for last year’s event, although I made some effort to simplify the set up where possible. This year, the main rig was a TenTec Omni VII, a radio with clearly marked controls and big tuning knob. Most people could sit down at this rig and be on the air in a matter of minutes without reference to reading material, nifty or otherwise. Instead of three antennas, we went with two: a moxon for westward gain on 20 meters, and a G5RV for all band coverage. The Omni had no difficulty tuning the G5RV for any band that we tried (10, 15, 20, 40, 80).

One major difference from last year is that we did not shut down in the wee morning hours. Both of the CW stations pounded brass for the entire 24 hour period of the contest. We had more operators than the previous year and divided the shifts carefully to assure that at least one person would be at the key all the time. It also helped that several of us brought our own tents this year for quick cat naps. We were all a bit punchy by Sunday morning, but after several cups of coffee, we powered through the rest of the event.

The CW tent is near a busy intersection and more accessible to other parts of the park, so we had a number of visitors drop by the 80/20 tent.  Some of these visitors turned out to be hams eager to put their hands on the paddles, and a few of them racked up an impressive list of contacts and we made sure to invite them back for next year. The more operators we have, the more pleasant staffing becomes. We might even be able to put someone on VHF CW for part of field day next year.

The 20 meter moxon (left) and G5RV (right) supported by a 40 foot military push-up mast, guyed at 3 levels.

Our computer wasn’t fully networked in at the start of the contest, so I don’t know how all the stations did. I have fuzzy recollection that we had around three hundred contacts on 20m and another 300 or so on 80m. We also worked on 15m for a while on Saturday evening, when the 40/15 station had gone to 40m and our 20m operation had been interfering with the SSB 20m station. I’m eager to see the final numbers after all the logs are merged.

One item to consider for next year — is it time to bring an SDR radio to field day? Would a graphic view of the whole band give us an advantage? Would a Flex radio (or other similar radio) play well with the other radios? I like the feel of a big tuning knob and I am used to zipping up and down the band by ear, but that’s all a matter of habit, and if there is better technology, we should consider it. Maybe it would be worth a test drive at some other event before field day 2013.

June mW Sprint

The view west towards mount roseI was sent on fairly short notice to attend a meeting at Lake Tahoe, which is just south of Reno along the California/Nevada border. I had one free evening before the conference, and it just happened to fall on the date of an NAQCC Sprint. I gave serious thought to throwing a wire out the hotel window, but the surrounding mountains called to me. This was not the usual monthly sprint, but the milliwatt version, so I figured that I needed all the help I could get and wanted to take advantage of the elevation.

After some quality time with Google Maps, it looked like Mount Rose was the highest accessible peak in the area. There is a parking lot near the trails that lead to the top of the mountain, but I didn’t think a business suit and dress shoes would fair very well on the gravely slopes. Across the road from the park lot is a campground with picnic tables and tall trees: the ingredients for comfortable field operations. In principle, there is a trail that runs up from the campground to Mount Slide, which, like Mount Rose is a SOTA peak. Again, if I had the right clothing and gear I might have attempted it, but it just wasn’t going to happen this trip. I settled for the 9000+ foot elevation of the campsite.

The view North, down the slopeI tossed a water bottle with a string into a tree, fired up the FT817nd on internal batteries and tuned up with the Hendricks SLT tuner. Before the Sprint, I worked WW0SS in Minnesota on 2.5W. Everything went faster than I had planned, so I laid down on the picnic bench and basked for a while.

I started searching around just a bit before the sprint to get a sense of band conditions. When the sprint started, I alternated between searching and calling. A number of local signals masked the sprint stations for a while, particularly with the poor selectivity of the ft817 (without a filter). I heard quite a few, some of whom were operating at 5W, while others were true milliwatt (less than 1W) stations.

I kept the rig at 0.5W for the entire event, and although I had two small lead acid batteries in the radio bag, I never had to use them. The 817 was running on fumes by the end of the sprint, but I was glad to see that it could make it through two hours of minimal power operation that had included a lot of calling.

All in all, I had six qsos on 20 and 40m. I reported 5 on the NAQCC sprint page because I wasn’t sure the last qso was complete, but I heard afterwards by email from the other station and confirmed that he had, in fact, correctly copied by call at the end of the contest. I think we gave each others 339 for that contact, and I recall that we needed a lot of repeats due to a mixture of summer weather background sounds, QSB and neighboring signals.

I didn’t come close to winning the sprint or even my category, but I enjoyed the scenery and the chance to sign myself as AI4SV/7.

WV Double Whammy

A few days ago, a troublesome area of the sun rotated earthwards and belched forth a stream of plasma meant to make my weekend challenging. A second coronal mass ejection occurred shortly after, with a higher velocity stream in the direction of Earth. Both shockwaves arrived during the West Virginia QSO Party. This K-index histogram covers the period of the QSO Party up to the point that I returned home.

The WVQSOP runs over the whole weekend, but I was only able to join on Sunday. I knew about the CMEs, but figured that I’d still be able to make a least local contacts. I was also hopeful that as the day progressed, conditions would improve.

Since it was also father’s day, Lara decided to accompany me on my mad drive around WV. I had planned a course through three of the northeastern counties: Morgan, Hampshire and Hardy. Looking over reports from recent years, there were some Morgan entries, but not much for Hampshire and Hardy, which is suprising considering that both are near enough to the Baltimore/Washington corridor that it should be possible for hams from those areas to support the event.

My flight plan took me first to the Capacon Mountain Resort, a state park with some really nice facilities, but most importantly, a road that runs to the top of a 2500+ foot ridge. From the observation parking lot at the top, there is a clear shot east and west.

I set up the Tarheel screwdriver antenna and tuned around on 40m and 20m — I heard almost nothing. I know that the car station works okay — I worked Sardinia and the Virgin Islands last night on the way home from work, and I’ve had lots of DX success with the antenna. After about an hour and a half, I had one CW contact on 20m, and one very surprised voice contact on 40m. The voice contact was at least 58 from New York — he said I was the only station he heard on the air, and the feeling was mutual.

The operating location in Hampshire County wasn’t ideal, so I didn’t spend long there, and logged no contacts. I continued towards the VA border and stopped just short, on top of another ridge to get some contacts in for Hardy county. It was getting towards evening (7 pm local / 23:00Z) and 20m seemed to have some life. I worked two more stations on 40m cw, both in Indiana, and one in Kansas on 20m.  So, at the end of the day, what do I have to show for the effort? Five contacts.

Throughout the entire contest, I didn’t hear one other WV station. I had wondered why I had no logged contacts on LOTW, and only a couple that issued physical QSL cards. The low activity seems to be a combination of the number of hams in WV and their level of participation in this contest. Looking at the past logs, it looks like participants from states outside WV dominate the contest.

I’d  like to revisit the Capacon resort this summer for camping or perhaps for next year’s WV QSO Party. The one change I’d make would be a full size antenna. Even if I were to deploy from a car, I’d consider hanging some sort of wire antenna with a tree support and running the cable to the car. The screwdriver is a versatile antenna, but still physically very short.

For next year’s reference, and for anyone else who works the WV QSO Party, I’ve prepared a reference sheet of the counties in West Virginia in a more friendly format that is found on the event website.

 

Scoping Out Lambs Knoll Summit

a topographic map showing APRS pings from Lambs KnollThere are a limited number of SOTA peaks within a short drive of Washington, DC, and most of them, particularly the ones with zero activations,  are on private property. After spending a little time with the SOTA database, I found one promising peak less than an hour’s drive away: Lambs Knoll,  W3/WE-007. The most attractive feature is that it is located on the Appalachian Trail, and as a plus, it is line of sight to the VWS repeater.

A Google Map view shows that the trail winds back and forth, with a road running up the middle of it towards a facility on the peak. Even in the aerial photo, it is clear that there are two large log periodic antennas on that site, which turns out to be an FAA facility. By some accounts, this facility started as a Cold War continuity of government site (designated Corkscrew), but presumably, it no longer performs that function.

I drove to Fox’s Gap, along Reno Monument Road. Just off the side of the road, there is a dirt parking lot. The monument to General Reno and some historic markers are also there. The road leading to the FAA site is marked “road may close without notice”, but the metal gate somewhat up the road does not look like it has moved in recent times. The Appalachian Trail crosses Reno Monument Road and runs through the parking lot and into the woods.

The white-blaze trail winds through the woods and eventually rises towards a clearing, where large high tension lines run down the hill. The trail then continues for some distance and forks, with a blue trail running level, and the white trail continuing upward. The path becomes increasingly steep and rocky. On the day that I went, I ran into a good number of hikers on this part of the trail. At one point, the trail crosses the road to the FAA facility and then continues upward. From here, the ascent is not so steep, though, and the trail wraps around the facility.

An aerial shot fo two log periodic antennas within the compound
Log Periodic Antennas from Google Maps

At the point that I thought I’d have line of sight to Tyson’s Corner, Virginia, I was successful in hitting the 70cm VWS repeater with my handheld at 5W using my Comet antenna. From that same position (the red dot on the above topopgraphic map), I was able to get acknowledgement to APRS squirts from three digipeaters.

After climbing back down, I drove the access road up to the facility. It is a nicely paved road and winds up the hill. At the point where the power lines cross the road, a fence runs along each side of the road, blocking access to the cleared strip of land under the lines. There are gates in the fences, but they are closed. The Appalachian Trail crosses the road higher up, with some minor signage to indicate the intersection.

At the top of the hill, the road splits with the main facility to the right and an emergency vehicle entrance straight ahead. I did not approach the main entrance, but it looks to be  a remotely-controlled electronic fence, probably with a card reader and some cameras. From the front of the facility, I could not see the log periodic or other recognizable antennas.

To reduce the climb time, one could probably drive up the road, drop operators off, and park the car back near the Reno Monument. Park the car along the side of the road is not a good option. The weakness of this plan is that whomever drove the car either has to wait in the parking lot for a “pick us up” call, or has to hike the whole trail — but it would allow the operators to get into position more quickly and have a longer operating day.

There is no indicate of hours of operation along the trail — it is not a park that closes at night, but it is probably best to tackle it in the day time. There may be some sort of camping along the blue trail, although I’d just drive out for the day.

Sugarloaf & QRPTTF

French Bread Loaf, Copyright © 2004 David MonniauxThe weekend was the QRP TTF event, and this year’s rules favored stations that did double duty as SOTA (summits on the air) stations. The Vienna Wireless Society made its annual pilgrimage to Glyndon Park in Vienna, Virginia, and I was sorely tempted to hang out there and partake in the barbecuage. However, the SOTA bug still had its fangs in me, so I headed to Sugarloaf Mountain in Maryland, or in SOTA terms peak W3/CR-003.

Sugarloaf Mountain is in private hands, but the land owners have opened it up for public use. The lone peak rises prominently above the surrounding farmland. Access is not bad at all — there is a road that runs up the mountain, with three parking lots providing views to the West, East, and South (towards the Potomac River). I had downloaded a trail map from the Sugarloaf website and decided to approach the summit from the Western Overlook.

The path up is well maintained, and consists predominantly of stone stairs. There’s a handrail at the steepest parts. Little kids were running up and down the stairs, impatient for the adults. I took a few breathers on the way up, but it wasn’t too bad a climb, even with equipment.

When I got up there, I found a slanting rock at the very top and made it my base. Being on the edge of the Washington Metro area (and perhaps the Southern edge of the Baltimore region), there were lots of visitors, some who watched with amusement as I tossed soda bottles with strings into the trees, and others who asked me questions about the hobby.

I set up the 20m station first, a TenTec 1320, which I had built from a kit three years ago, plus a longwire antenna and the Hendricks SLT+ tuner. The usual. Later in the day, I put up a longer wire antenna and brought out the 40m Rockmite.

Once at the top, I checked into the club via the 2m repeater, but found that the 440 was quieter. I had brought along a homemade yagi that I had used on the FM sats last year; I’m not sure it helped that much. Ian, N0IMB spotted me on the SOTA site, and that led to a short flurry of contacts on 20m.

Shortly after the first contact, there was a brief hail storm with tiny pebbly hail. I covered everything in the plastic that I had brought along, but luckily the storm did not convert to rain, and weather remained cool but clear for the rest of the day.

I set up my VX-8GR hand held on the summit, and used it to post my current frequency and coordinates via APRS. I heard confirmation tones from at least three digipeaters, but I’m not sure if anyone actually used this information to find me on HF.

My first contact, W7CNL was nice enough to spot me on 20m, and later N4EX did the same on 40. I was pleased to work three members of the Vienna Wireless Society, including Kevin WB0POH, who was operating the club station K4HTA at Glyndon Park. He later told me that he was trying out Tom N4ZPT’s new KX3. The signal was paperthin and went in and out, but we managed to complete the call. Later, I had a clear QSO with Jake, N4UY who was using an attic antenna and putting out 2W on a GM20 transceiver.  Finally, I worked Ray Albers, K2HYD from his home in North Carolina on the Rockmite.

My longest distance contact was G4ELZ Jeff from the UK. The rest of the 20m contacts were west coast US, TX/OK, or Florida. The total for the day was 22 worked on 20m QRP, and four more on 40m QRPp.  Looking over the log, I worked the following states: NJ, OH, NC, PA, NY, AL, OK, TX, FL, MI, MD, VA, OR and ID. Florida was disproportionately represented in the log because I worked a few FQP stations. I also worked a number of QRPTTF stations, plus one summit-to-summit contact with AA5CK on W5/QA-008 in Oklahoma.

I was glad to get the rockmite out for some exercise. I’ve now worked about 30 station with it, corresponding to six states. It was a rough ride with the rockmite due to lack of selectivity, and I appreciate the work of the other stations in pullings its signal out.

I stopped working on 40m when the clouds grew dark, and on my way through the parking lot back to the car, the storm broke. I avoided getting drenched by about ten minutes.

Signal Mountain Activated

some rocks
The peak of signal mountain. Photo taken from our operating position, looking north.

Our visit to Signal Mountain, Virginia was successful, and summit W4/SH-049 has been activated for the first time (and perhaps the only time for the forseeable future).  We made a total of 19 QSOs, which we thought was reasonable for our first  SOTA activiation (and not really knowing what we were doing).

On the morning of April 14, 2012, I met up with Ian N0IMB and we drove out to the site. A Google Map query for “Signal Mountain, Virginia” puts an arrow right on the summit, and there is a road all the way to the top. That road is silky smooth, but the residential road that leads to it is a couple miles of gravel and dust.  We drove in and parked about just after the sharp bend in the road. According to the terrain feature on Google Maps, this put us a couple hundred feet from the summit.

I unpacked Dolly, who in this case was not a cloned sheep, but an old furniture dolly that I have used since college every time I change dwellings. Most of the equipment went into a milk crate that was bungeed to Dolly. Given the road access, we didn’t pack particularly lightly — folding camp chairs, some folding TV tables to work on, and a couple bags of equipment and snacks. As peaks go, this was a pleasure cruise.

I led Dolly up the slope, pulling on her leash, and Ian lugged the rest of the equipment. The road continues past the peak to a fenced government facility, but we stopped at the peak and headed eastward up a gentle slope into the woods. When we got to the actual stony peak, Ian found a nice place to erect the buddipole tripod, and I set up the radios.

The buddy pole went up quickly, and we played with the counterpoise until we arrived at a 1:1 SWR on 20m (Ian made me take a picture of the MFJ tuner as evidence!). We tuned around on 20m and quickly came to the realization that our stated operating frequency was just wishful thinking. The band was humming from one end to the other with QSO Party activity. We tried working a few of the NM QSOP stations, but although they were thundering in, they could not hear the 5W the Yaesu 817d was putting out. CW was a bit better, but the stock filtering on the 817d was relatively wide.

We decided that before we really set up shop, it would make more sense to put the antenna on 17m and see if we couldn’t get out better without all the background chatter. The buddipole retuned quickly, and we were soon on the air. Our first contact was Mike KE5AKL from NM, which is quite fitting since he was the first station that I had worked as a chaser, the day before.

After that, we worked a succession of stations, some with callsigns that I recognized. The TenTec 1320 sitting next to me in my bag had, for instance, been modified according to instructions that I had found on the website of our third contact, Scott W5ESE. Two contacts, Bob WB4KLJ and John AF4PD, were from our local club, the Vienna Wireless Society, and must have been working us direct from 25 miles to the east.   Jonathan AK4NL was also a very close contact, being located on Bull Run Mountain. Our stateside contacts on 17m included VA, CO, ID, NM, TX and OR.

We were very glad to make contacts with England (G4OBK), Scotland (MM0USU), and Germany (DJ5AV).  We are particularly grateful to Phil G4OBK, who stayed on frequency after working us, followed us up frequency when we had QRM, and warned off a station who was about to transmit on top of us. The other station likely could not hear our puny signal, but could copy the solid transmission coming from across the pond.

Around three in the afternoon, we switched to 40m. It was a little more involved to move the buddipole to 40m, but we finally got a reasonable match.  Predictably, on daytime 40m, we worked primarily the US east coast: PA, VA, MA, NJ, and NY.

We had intended to work until about 6 pm, but stopped early, because we were informed that the access road was being closed up at 4 pm. In talking with some guys from the facility, who turned out to be communications professionals, we learned that the facility houses some sensitive radio equipment. Although our signals did not cause any sort of interference, we agreed that we would recommend that others not work this summit, even at QRP levels.

We learned a number of lessons from our first activation, and here are the ones I can remember:

  • It is okay, indeed encouraged, to self-spot. We had so-so cellular connectivity, but in the future, getting the word out will include spotting on sotawatch, qrpspots, and via twitter.
  • Less equipment is better. We did not use the G5RV or the TenTec 1320; while there is some value in being prepared and having redundant equipment, if I had to carry the extra gear up a more challenging slope, I would not have been a happy camper.
  • The WARC bands are your friends. Ian and I both like 17 meters. If I had to pick one band, that would be it.
  • We had originally not planned to work 40m in the middle of the day, but the east coast US hams were grateful to hear us, so I’d factor that in next time, and try to split operation between local and more DX stations.
  • Our pre-posted operating frequencies went right out the window. Also, we had too many of them. It probably isn’t practical to work more than a couple bands on a given activation.
  • 5W on voice is difficult, but still worth it – when we did connect wth other stations, most of the time we received fairly good reports, and on our end, the other stations were loud.
  • For CW, I’d prefer a radio with better filtering (or maybe a modded 817).

 

SOTA: Signal Mountain, April 14

A snow-covered mountainIan, N0IMB, and I will attempt to activate Signal Mountain, Virginia as a Summit On The Air (SOTA)  on Saturday, April 14, 2012. Signal Mountain is less than an hour’s drive from my house, and with a name like Signal Mountain, it seems the natural choice. Strangely, for being so close to a metropolitan center, according to the SOTA database,  this “peak”  has never been activated.

Signal Mountain, SOTA designator W4/SH-049,  is a 416 m tall peak located at Long -77.7033 by  Lat 38.8816 degrees.  Conveniently, judging by a google map view of the site, a road runs up to the top, although by SOTA rules, we’ll park some ways down the road and lug the equipment to the top. We don’t have mules, but we do have a hand-truck and/or a furniture dolly, so we plan not to break our backs carting the equipment up the hill. While this may not sound very adventurous for more experienced SOTA enthusiasts, this is our first activation, so we are trying to keep it simple. One side benefit is that we’ll have a stronger signal: one item we are lugging will be a gas-powered generator, and we will be transmitting at 100W. [edited: Correction – it was pointed out by a more experienced SOTA-er that this would violate SOTA guidelines – no fossil fuel generators. Well, that’s fine with us, too. We’ll use storage cells, perhaps supplemented with a bit of solar if we can put our hands on the right equipment quickly enough. This means we will not be transmitting at 100W, or at least not for long stretches. Most of my gear is QRP already, so this isn’t a big adjustment. We’ll just talk louder :-)]  Rigs will be a Yaesu FT-817 and a TenTec 1320.

Operating Plan:

We will be operating under the call sign N0IMB from 16:00Z to 22:00Z on 14 April 2012. In local time, that is noon to 6 pm. Local sunset is 7:45 pm, so we should would like to pack up while we can see what we are doing.

We will operate voice from the top of each hour to forty-five minutes past, and then switch to CW for the last fifteen minutes. Typically, we will exchange a signal report, the name of the operator, and the SOTA designator.

Generally, we’ll stick to the following center frequencies. If these frequencies are busy, look for us up or down a bit:

Band CW Freq SSB Freq
40 7.027 7.187
30 10.127 cw only
20 14.027 14.277
17 18.077 18.127
15  21.027 21.287
12  24.897 24.947
10 28.027 28.487

We picked these frequencies after looking over the operating plans for other events on the same day (such as the various state QSO parties, the QCWA QSO party, etc.) as well as international band allocations. We may try 40m early in the day before strong absorbtion sets in, but then we’ll move to the higher frequencies. We are likely to spend the lionshare of the activation on 17 and 20m. In the last couple hours, we may try 30m. We will not be operation above 50Mhz for this event. [Note: Another update – to accomodate the US band plan, we have tweaked the center frequencies from the original posting, the three affected voice frequencies are highlighted in red.]

If anyone hears use, we’d sure appreciate being spotted so other people can find us! I think we will have cellular connectivity from the site, so we will also post our band changes via twitter (@dhakajack, with the hash tag #signalmt). My twitter account feeds to this website (http://blog.templaro.com), so the tweets will be visible in the right column in the desktop view. We will not post via twitter or SMS to qrpspots since we will be working barefoot for most of the event.