Winterfest 2012

The organization of the manual was excellent, with the usual check it and then check it again double column for checking off completed steps. There was no ambiguity in the instructions, all the landmarks were obvious, and I didn’t need to do any sort of clever interpretation or fall back on the internet to find exceptions, modifications, etc.

Calibration requires no equipment beyond a digital VOM. One trimmer pot controls internal reference voltage, and other pots are used to set the forward/reverse fudge factors for each power range. Having built the WM-2 QRP watt meter, I’d say that this one was slightly easier to calibrate. This SWR meter was a more complex build with more parts and more mechanical connections, but that is commensurate with its additional features (and I’m certainly keeping the WM-2 as well).

So, the 1225 Wattmeter was assembled over the last week and is now inserted inline between whatever rig I’m using (the first coax switch) and whatever antenna is selected (second coax switch). One fun feature of the 1225 is the RGB backlight, which can be adjusted to any color with trimmer pots. I’ve set mine to a dark blue.

TRS-80 model 100 and manualThe other item I bought was not radio equipment. Near the end of the hamfest, I walked by a table and saw a TRS80-Model 100 “laptop” computer. I’ve always thought this computer was way ahead of its time, and that it represented an important milestone in engineering, so when I saw one marked down to $50, I bought it.

This computer is powered either by wall wart or four AA batteries, has a full keyboard, boots instantly, and has a number of I/O ports including an RS-232 and the venerable S100 bus. I verified that this one is fully operational. I’m not sure exactly what I’ll do with it, but I think it was a good purchase.

 

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