QRP TTF 2013

For the 50th anniversary of the Vienna Wireless Society, the club operated under a special event call sign: W5O. As usual, there was a good turn out of club members for both the picnic and on-air activities. We put a couple rockmites, FT817s, and a KX3 on the air, and accumulated 62 contacts in our log in total running predominantly CW, but some phone as well. We had multiple contacts with other operators also participating in the QRP TTF, but also the Florida QSO Party, and one SOTA station. In the next couple weeks, we should send out our QSL cards to confirm the contacts.

untangleable1In the days before the event, I put together  an “untangleable folded dipole” antenna made from 300 ohm twinlead, plus a matching box comprised of two toroids and two capacitors. The antenna was based on a design found on the blog of KI6SN, and I summarized the construction details for my effort on a Google-plus post.

After spudgunning two trees, we hoisted the folded dipole to a flat 40-foot deployment. The feed line is about 25 feet, so a short BNC-terminated coax extension was used. The antenna worked great and allowed us to work a Swiss station, and to score reverse beacon hits throughout Europe on 20m.  I swept the antenna with a MFJ analyzer at the end of the event, and noted that SWR was below 1.2 for the entire CW portion of the band, and less than 2 from below 20m to above the voice portion of the band. So, quite impressed with the folded dipole design. As advertised, it packed up easily and without tangling.

untangle3

Stuffing code into an ATTINY 45

For the QLF project, I had to get my code onto an ATTINY 45, which wasn’t so difficult, but also to free up the RESET pin to act as a digital output, which a bit more doing.

My experience with microcontrollers, aside from some PIC activity a decade ago, has been confined to the Arduino, a prototyping platform that hides some of the complexity of creating projects built around some popular Atmel microcontrollers. There are many tools for developing code, transferring code to these chips, and setting the fuse options on these chips, but all I had on hand was my trusty Arduino, so I used it as a middleman to program the ATTINY 45.  There are plenty of other options available to get the compiled code (a hex file) into the flash memory of the chip, for example, the USBtiny or the tiny AVR, or the over-the-top Atmel STK600 programmers.

duemilanove_protoWhile the ATTINY45’s were on order, I worked out the code using the Arduino itself – this is, after all, its job in life: to serve as a rapid prototyping platform. The circuit was laid out on a solderless prototyping board and jumped over to the Arduino for testing. I realized that I’d need to change some of the pins later, but otherwise the code within the Arduino IDE is the same, whether developing for the ATmega328 on my Arduino Duemilanove or for the ATTINY.  There may be differences in the way the code compiles for the different chips, but all that is abstracted away.

With all of the code working when tethered for life support to the Arduino, I needed to migrate it over to ATTINY 45. I found instructions on how to use the Arduino as an in-system programmer (ISP) and how to connect it to the ATTINY on the High-Low Tech website. Their procedure worked for, using my Duemilanove board and version 1.0.1 of the Arduino environment. However, I have a couple comments on their recommended procedure — I didn’t see a place on their website to provide feedback, but it is possible that they’ll have corrected these items in the future:

1.  The general idea of connecting the “ISP header” from the Arduino over to a target can be used to program a number of chips, including the ATTINY. The idea is to connect power, ground, MISO, MOSI, SCK, and RESET from one chip to the other. MOSI goes to MOSI, MISO goes to MISO (rather than crossed wiring). The picture shown on the instruction page is correct, but the pin numbering for the ATTINY described below the picture isn’t. It should read:

  • ATtiny Pin 7 to Arduino digital output 13, physical pin 19 (or SCK of another programmer.
  • ATtiny Pin 6 to Arduino digital output 12, physical pin 18 (or MISO of another programmer)
  • ATtiny Pin 5 to Arduino digital output 11, physical pin 17 (or MOSI of another programmer)
  • ATtiny Reset Pin (1) to Arduino digital output 16, physical pin 16 (or RESET of another programmer)

2.  That tutorial recommends installing ATTINY-specific definition files into the Arduino IDE, and points towards a file found on github, https://github.com/damellis/attiny/.  This file provides a mapping of the pins on the ATTINYx5. A number of basic arduino functions like the ability read and write to pins will work on the ATTINY, but not the tone() function. Instead of using installing the file from github, I found another core on Google Code, arduino-tiny.  This provides not just a pin definition, but a number of libraries like serial, wire, and the tone function that I needed.

3. The 10uF capacitor shown in the picture will not be needed for all versions of arduino; having it probably doesn’t hurt anything, though.

So, to reiterate the main points of that tutorial, the major steps are:

  1. Write code for the ATTINY. Make sure it compiles. Save it.
  2. Close the arduino IDE, add the core definition files to the hardware subdirectory, relaunch the IDE.
  3. Upload the “Arduino as ISP” sketch to the Arduino. This comes with the Arduino distribution.
  4. Connect the Arduino to the ATTINY — six wires.
  5. Select the ATTINY from the “Boards” menu.
  6. Select “Arduino as ISP” from the “Programmer” menu. No change to the serial port settings, please.
  7. By default, without an external clock, the ATTINY will run at 1 Mhz. To get it run faster, make sure that 8Mhz is selected in the board menu, and choose the “burn bootloader” option. It doesn’t really burn a bootloader, but it does set the fuses appropriately in the ATTINY. This operation also wipes out the flash memory in the ATTINY.
  8. Load ATTINY code that you want transferred.
  9. Hit “upload”. The code should transit the Arduino and end up in the ATTINY.

If you want to modify the code, no problem – just edit and upload again.

Physical pin 1 of the ATTINY is typically used for RESET, but to use it for I/O, bit 7 of the high fuse (RSTDISBL) has to be set. Once this happens, the chip cannot be reprogrammed by the ISP method described above — it essentially becomes read-only, unless the chip is restored using a high-voltage programmer – an item that I don’t have on hand (although one can be made with some common parts thanks to various plans online plans).  Once I was sure that the program behaved as desired, I looked for a way to manually set the fuses (short of using avrdude from the command line — I’m not quite there).

I came across a program called “hexloader” that can both upload hex files and set fuses without requiring anything beyond an Arduino in terms of equipment. Unless you modify the hexloader sketch, by default it uses other pins to connect to the ATTINY. Arduino digital pins 4, 5, 6, and 7 connect to ATTINY physical pins 7, 1, 6, and 5, respectively. Refer to the picture on the gammon.co.au website.

To change the fuse settings on the ATTINY, open the serial monitor and make sure that the line termination character is set to “newline”. Also, make sure that the serial speed matches up with the hexloader program.  A menu will display in the serial monitor; choose “F” to access fuses. The low, high and extended fuse settings were 0x62, 0xDF, and 0xFF.

Adding a high bit in the 7th position to the high fuse, the desired high fuse setting is 0x5F. You could also consult an online fuse setting calculator to see what options are available.

Follow the menu settings to commit this change to the fuses. Once this is done, the hex loader program reports that it can no longer enter “program mode”  — which makes sense, since the chip is no longer programmable.

QLF (version 1 and 2)

Monty_python_footOne of the limiting factors in making optimal use of a radio is the number of human appendages that interact meaningfully with the radio, hence the importance of a big knob on the front of the radio and hands to turn it. Morse code operators have known this since the dawn of time and have a Q-signal dedicated to the use of the left foot to send messages: QLF. This versatile expression is more often used in the interrogative, i.e., “QLF?”, or “Are you sending with your left foot?”

There are several physiological reasons why sending code with the left foot is not a good idea, although with practice it might be an option for some. For the rest of us, though, perhaps the left foot could be used for other purposes, leaving the hands free to operate the radio, and more importantly, convey items back and forth from the mouth during radio operation, supplying the operator with the necessary calories and hydration to make it through a contest.

teamspeak1And so was born the QLF Device.

Well, not really.

Several factors led to development of this project. First, our radio club had started using TeamSpeak for internet conferencing. We had run a few CW practice nets on HF, but most of the time, band conditions did not permit all of the interested members to participate, since our members are not just from the local area. This VOIP solution worked very well, and while we know it’s not radio, it’s a fine way to practice.

One issue that arose was that the software worked best in “”PTT” mode, where a key was depressed when the sender wanted to open his/her microphone. There is a VOX option in the software, but it often led to unintentional microphone keying during the session, feedback, and general interruption of the practice sessions. Any key can be designated, but metakeys (like ALT, CTRL, etc.) work best, since they are not likely to be used for anything else during the session.  A number of members remarked that it takes some coordination to depress a computer keyboard key with one hand, while working a straight key or paddles with the other.

n1mmAnother need that has arisen in the past relates to contesting. Foot pedals would be helpful in two contexts: 1) for keying the rig’s microphone PTT during voice operation, allowing the operator to use a hands-free boom mike, and 2) for sending a “CQ” message during a contest.  In the former case, we’re looking for some kind of physical connection to either the microphone jack or ACC jack of a rig, in the latter case, since “running” a frequency usually amounts to repeatedly stabbing the F1 key of some contesting software (e.g., N1MM) to play a canned message or send a CQ message in morse code, what we want is a means of sending the “F1” keystroke to a computer.

These thoughts were rolling through my head when I noticed that Adafruit was offering a foot pedal switch at a reasonable price ($7.95 for single units, less if ordered in quantity).  I ordered a few to check them out, and while awaiting delivery, sketched out the “design spec” for the QLF device:

  1. The QLF should allow direct control by making or  breaking a connection for physical switching, i.e., for microphone PTT.
  2. The QLF should send “keyboard” characters — at least two of them:  F1 and a meta character
  3. When sending keyboard characters, the device should operate in three modes: a) PTT (continuous while pushed); b) One shot (no matter how long QLF is actuated); c) Toggle on/off (to avoid fatigue)
  4. The QLF should provide adequate feedback for the user to know which mode and character are selected
  5. The QLF should be dead simple to operate, even after 24 hours in the contest chair on a diet consisting solely of cheetos and lime diet coke.
  6. The QLF should be relatively RF resistant
  7. The QLF should not require its own batteries and shouldn’t consume much power
  8. The QLF should be smaller than the rig it operates
  9. The QLF should be cheap. Like, less then ten bucks or otherwise made of stuff in the junque box.

footswitch_LRGBefore deciding on how to hook things up, a few dissections were in order, starting with the foot pedal. The construction of the foot pedal appears to be sturdy. It has a hard plastic upper portion, which seems thick enough to stand on and the bottom portion is metal. Although there might be enough room inside the pedal to stash some components, it doesn’t seem easy to open the case.

A grey wire about two meters in length emerges from the back of the switch. Slicing the wire open reveals three internal conductors: red, white, and black. There is no shielding on the cable, and no ferrite is present. If RF were a problem, it might be worth replacing this wire with a shielded cable (for example, a sacrificed USB cable) and slapping ferrite clamp around the wire on the end that attaches to the QLF device. So far, this hasn’t been necessary, though.

3pt5mmThe three wires allow the switch to be used to either open or close a circuit. Red and black are normally connected, but depressing the switch breaks that connection. If you use red and white, you get the converse case, which is likely of more use. My plan was to terminate the switch wire with a 3.5mm connector so that I would have maximum flexibility in connecting devices to the switch, depending how I wired the jack connecting to the device (i.e., a radio or the QLF device). Since red is common to both configurations, I connected it to the barrel, and soldered black to ring and white to tip. This means that I can use the cheaper mono jack or stereo jack to access the red/white combination.

The next step was figure out how to make the action of stepping on a switch send one or another character to a computer, presumably over USB, since PS2 connectors are now passé.  Again, I started with some dissection to understand how keystrokes are normally sent from keyboard to computer. Actually, there are plenty of fine descriptions of this on the internet, so it wasn’t so much a matter of understanding as needed to harvest the brains of a few keyboards for use in this project.

Starting from an existing keyboard seemed reasonable because 1) the number of trashed usb keyboards on this planet exceeds the number of rats; 2) USB is complicated, and developing a device to duplicate the functionality of a keyboard seemed like a difficult and potentially expensive way to start.

upperlowerIf you rip apart an USB keyboard, there are usually three layers: the keys, a rubbery mat, and a matrix of conductors printed on plastic sheets. Conductors from the upper plastic sheet are brought into contact with the lower sheet when keys are mashed down. The conductors all lead back to an edge connector, and a small logic board attaches to the plastic sheets at that point. Usually, there are about 25 to 30 pins that join the board to the plastic. One sheet connects to about eight of the pins, and the other sheet to the rest. The USB cable itself also connects to the board — two data lines, a positive, a reference ground, and a shield ground.

Without really knowing too much else about how all this works, it was clear that connecting some of the pins to other pins would send characters to the computer… but which pins? One internet how-to site recommends tracing the keyboard key layout onto the plastic layers and then obsessively tracing each one back to the edge connectors to create a complicated map. That should appeal to anyone who has enjoyed mapping a maze of twisty passages, all alike.

logicboardsI opted for plan B — a program that runs on the computer and displays which character is being pressed. I downloaded keyposé, a program that is free for private and academic use. It ran fine under Windows XP SP3. The program was developed to assist in creating software demos.  When this program runs, it will indicate which key is pressed, whether on the computer’s main console keyboard or on another one attached to a USB port.  The beauty of this program is that it shows which meta keys are being pressed, or even which combos are pressed.

I initially mapped the keyboard logical module pins by noting which character appeared when I connected every permutation of pins, i.e, pin 1 and 2, pin 1 and 3, pin 1 and 4, etc. This yields a matrix which has both some blank spots and some redundant spots.  After I did this with three keyboards, I came to the conclusion that this mapping is not standardized, even for a given manufacturer, so this process of figuring out which pins are important cannot be avoided.

keymatrixHowever, there is a short cut. Since we’re only trying to fire off the F1 key and some other meta key, why bother mapping all the keys?  First, concentrate on finding the two-pin combination that produces F1. If possible, see if either of the pins involved can be paired with another pin to produce a meta-character. If so, this makes life easier later on and saves on part count since one pin can be common.

How smart is it to take a piece of wire and start strumming it across the connector pins, while the logic  board is plugged into your valuable laptop via the USB cable? Well, I can only give you my experience — nothing blew up. Most laptops are smart enough to shut down a USB port when the current draw exceeds specification.  Even so, it might be a good idea to use an older laptop or to connect via a USB hub for testing.

After using a piece of copper wire for this purpose for a while, it occurred to me that they keyboard itself might have some resistance between leads rather than a dead short, as some of the runs of ribbon-thin conductor are pretty long. I measured between 30 and 70 ohms resistance on average for short and long runs, so some small value resistor might serve the purpose better than plain wire, but using a wire didn’t seem to harm anything when I did it.

Since the solution is now to make a connection between different pins to send either “F1” or a meta-character (I settled on “CTRL”, but any would do), the next step was pretty obvious – to use a transistor as a switch between the appropriate pins.  To get all the functionality of the different “modes”, though, would require some circuitry upstream of the switching transistor. My first inclination was to use a microcontroller, but that seemed like overkill and probably not the cheapest way to get what I wanted. Instead, I opted to use a couple old workhorse components. Power for the circuit is derived from the USB cable itself. The USB standard guarantees up to about 500mA available, and we won’t come near that.

Schematic: QLF version 1.0
Schematic: QLF version 1.0

A single SP3T switch selects the mode (PTT, one-shot, or toggle on/off) by directing the appropriate high output signal to the gate of a 2N7000 N-channel MOSFET. This switches the MOSFET on, and current flows through the pins connected to the MOSFET’s source and drain. I had measured the voltage on those pins before connecting, and the higher voltage should go to the drain, and lower or ground to the source. If you get this backwards, it’s not a problem, but the MOSFET will conduct all the time, and this will be apparent because the keyposé program will show that the character is being sent constantly.  Since there are two characters that potentially could be sent, a second switch directs the appropriate pins to the source and drain terminals of the MOSFET.  The state of this version 1 QLF device is always obvious from the position of the switches, one for mode, one for character.  Since the gate of the MOSFET is brought high whenever a character is sent, an indicator LED is also attached to the gate. When the LED glows, a character is being sent; this provides some useful feedback to the user about what is going on during normal use.

The PTT function is the most straight forward. When the foot pedal is depressed, the base the 2N3906 PNP transistor pulled to ground and current flows from +5V on the collector to the emitter, and through the mode select switch to the MOSFET described above.

The one-shot function is desirable because sending multiple key strokes quickly to a program like N1MM results in a string of CQ messages being generated, one after the other. Similarly, holding down the character on a keyboard could result in repeated generation of the character. Since neither case is what the user usually intends, the purpose of the one-shot is to emit a single keystroke, even if two switch closures happen very close together (i.e., switch bounce), or if the switch is held down. You can stand on the foot pedal, but you’ll only get one keystroke when this mode is active.

To achieve this functionality, a 555 timer is used in monostable mode, with its output (pin 3) connected to the gate of the 2N7000 MOSFET via the mode select switch. The 555’s trigger pin (2) is normally pulled high. It connects to the switch through a 0.1 uF capacitor. When the switch closes, that capacitor is grounded and pin 2 sees a transient dip in voltage — enough to satisfy the op amps inside the 555 that something important is going on. The 555 fires off, and the duration of its output on pin 3 is determined by the combination of the capacitor and resistor connected to pins 6 and 7; specifically, the duration in seconds is 1.1 * R * C.   I  went with a 0.1 second pulse because this should be long enough for the logic board to register this keystroke and not so long that it starts repeating. The tolerances of electrolytic capacitors are not precise (particularly when they have been sitting in the junque pile for an indefinite period), so best not to choose to low a value for the capacitor. The LED provides a direct read out that the one-shot is functioning as designed.

Finally, there is the toggle on/off mode. This mode is meant to spare operators some foot fatigue. Rather than hold down the pedal for their entire long-winded transmission, the pedal can be pressed once at the beginning of the session to key the computer (and/or rig), and then again at the end to unkey it. What is needed here is a T-flip/flop circuit – a circuit that can remember its state, and every time it is poked, change to the complementary state.

74hc4024I grabbed the cheapest, simplest IC that I had on hand for this purpose, but many substitutes would also work here. There are plenty of references on the internet about how to make other kinds of  flip-flops (e.g., a JK Flip-Flop) replicate the function of a T-flip-flop, but I used a 74HC4024 ripple counter which internally has a series of T-flip flops. I pulled down the reset line of the counter to take it out of the equation, and then just drove the clock input from the output of the 555 timer. Now, every time the 555 emitted a pulse, the first flip-flop in the counter would change state, high or low. That flip-flop’s output was connected to the  2N7000 MOSFET through the mode-select switch. The rest of the functionality of the counter was not used, which seems like a waste until you learn that the cost of the chip, new, is 37 cents.

The general solution for connecting to the pins on the logic board is to use a DPDT switch. However, if a pin combination can be found such that one pin is in common for both F1 and a meta key, a cheaper SPST switch can be used — the common pin goes directly to the MOSFET, and the switch just selects which of the other pins connects to the other side of the MOSFET.

A few items were thrown into the design for good measure — decoupling capacitors on the ICs, as well as one across the switch leads. That latter capacitor was meant to shunt high-frequency RF from the switch line – but I don’t know if it actually helps. The capacitor on the reset line of the counter chip is not a decoupler – it’s job is to transiently go positive when the circuit is energized, putting the counter in a determinate state at power up. This assures that initially, if the device is put into toggle on/off mode, it will be off. (One corollary of this  logic is that if the device is later switched into toggle mode, it might be in the “on” state, since the counter will receive one-shots from the 555 every time the pedal is down, even when other modes are active).

Finally, I added a 56 ohm resistor between the logic board pins, since this would come closer to the real resistance of a keyboard. I have no idea if this is important or not, but resistors are cheap.

I felt good about this solution, so I transferred the circuit to vector board and stuck it in a cast aluminum case strong enough to survive the zombie apocalypse. To get it into a case, I made a sandwich, with the keyboard logic board on the bottom, some spacers, and the vector board on the top, with various screws to hold things in place. The most expensive part of the project was the $5 box (not counting the cost of the pedal itself, since it can be used for other purposes in addition to the QLF).

v1guts

v1box

In developing version 2 of the project, I wanted to try a microprocessor solution to the same problem. The motivating factors (aside from, wouldn’t it be cool?) were:

  1. To save on hardware costs. The electronics in version 1 were all cheap, but as often is the case, most of the cost came from the mechanical items — toggle switches and the case itself. A smaller case with cheaper switches would be preferable.
  2. Flexibility – rather than “coding” everything in wiring, a microprocessor-based QLF could be “reprogrammed” to some extent by popping the chip, re-flashing it, and sticking it back in.
  3. Lower part count – in principle, the core functions could all be done in one rather than two chips, without outboard resistors and capacitors to handle timing, trick the chips into triggering, etc.
  4. Better user interface, in this case blinky lights and sound. Not absolutely necessary, but nice touches.

I started roughing out the design using an Arduino Duemilanove, but my intention was not to include this prototyping platform in a final product. After all, even an older Arduino costs above 20 dollars. The ATmega328 used on this board also seemed like overkill – much more memory and ports than needed, and in a 28pin package, larger than I would have liked.

Instead, I went with the ATTINY45, a chip that costs less than a dollar, and which can be programmed via the familiar Arduino IDE with minimal additional effort (described in the next post). The challenge in using the ATTINY chip was to achieve all the desired functionality using a chip with a limited number of pins devote to input/output.

guzintas2The vision for the version 2 design was to have two push button switches, one for mode and one for character. Pressing the mode button would cycle through the three modes available: PTT, one-shot and toggle on/off. To keep track of this, we’d need some indicator, since switch position would no longer tell use what mode we are using. The character select would toggle between F1 and meta-character, and again, we’d need some indication of which character was active. As in the previous design, we would also need some way of reading and acting on the pedal switch state.

One frill I wanted in this design was an audio indicator for mode and character, since the QLF might not be visible from the operating position. The tone function is part of the standard Arduino library and it is easy to drive a piezo speaker using a single digital output.

The ATTINY series chips have 8-pin chips, and the models differ in amount of flash memory: ATTINY 25, 45, and 85, have 2k, 4k and 8k, respectively. Two chips are devoted to power (Vcc, GND), and one is used to reset the chip. Of the remaining, two pins are connected to a crystal to provide an external clock, leaving three pins. This is clearly not enough for everything described above. However, between the chip’s versatility and some design tricks, a solution was found.

attinypinpout

First, the external crystal was dropped from the design. The ATTINY can use an internal RC oscillator for a time base. It is less precise, but nothing we’re doing here requires exquisite timing. Depending on how the chip’s fuses are set, the RC oscillator can generate a 1 Mhz or 8 Mhz clock. I opted for 8 Mhz, but 1 Mhz probably would work, and would take less power.

Refer to the version 2 schematic for the following discussion:

qlf2_mono

Next, the three switches (pedal, mode, character) were multiplexed onto one analog input. The switches connect in common to one side of a voltage divider, and each switch connects to ground through a resistor with a specific value. The values were chosen (see spreadsheet) such that even with maximum tolerated deviation of the two voltage divider resistors, the resulting voltages would fall into non-overlapping ranges as detected by the chip’s ADC (1023 values, from 0 to 5V).

For indicators, one digital output was devoted to a single LED for mode: off for PTT (default), on for single shot, and blinking for toggle on/off mode. Another digital output was devoted to which character was selected. A design decision was made to indicate F1 on one LED, and the meta-character on the other LED. This design used complementary transistors to assure that one of the two character LEDs was always lit. Another option that would have saved  a few parts would have been to use a single LED with it off state representing F1 and on state representing the meta-character. This seemed like more to remember, though, versus having the name of the character written next to the LED on the case.

Two 2N7000 MOSFETs are used in this design, one to switch on each pin pair on the keyboard logic board. A digital output from the microcontroller is directly connected to the gate of each MOSFET.

With this layout, the design was still a pin short — the one needed to drive the piezo element for sound. This was a workable design, but to get that last pin required special effort. I’ll describe how the ATTINY was programmed from the Arduino IDE, and how I freed up the RESET pin to use as an output in the next post because it does get a bit more hairy.

Sound is used in this design by beeping one, two or three times in a high tone to indicate mode, and once or twice in a lower tone to indicate which character is selected.

Here is some pseudocode for what’s going on inside the ATTINY:

pseudocode

The code that I actually wrote for the project can be found in a repository on Google Code.  If this code is loaded on a chip that has not been modified to use the RESET pin as audio out, the code runs normally, but of course there is no sound output. The code compiles into less than 4K, so it will fit on an ATTINY45. Without the sound-related routines, it would fit on an ATTINY25. Counterintuitively, when I went to buy chips for this project, ATTINY25 was more expensive than the 45, and the 45 was just a couple cents more than the 85.

version2_exploded

The version 2 board was smaller than version 1 and fit in a smaller a marginally cheaper aluminum case. Overall, this is a less expensive approach, but not by too much (see spreadsheet). The main cost drivers are the mechanical components in the first design, but purchasing the items in bulk and/or from ebay brings the prices down considerably. The cost of assembly also depends on what is in the junque bin. In both designs, most of the components are very common, and there is considerable latitude for substituting other values.

version2_in_box

I did attempt a third version — one that doesn’t require gutting an old keyboard, but this approach hasn’t really paid off at this point — except as an example of what not to do. I’ll write up that experience, but first, more details on programming the ATTINY45 (next post).

 

Postscript 1: In retrospect, an obvious source for the flipflop in the QLF version one would have been another 555 module. One 556 could serve both purposes. This is the sort of thing I think of after the project…

Postscript 2: With USB integrated into more modern arduino and work-alike boards and the boards becoming so cheap, the project could be done in software only, without having to dumpster dive an old keyboard control board. But where would be fun be in that?