Mac-based multiuser N1MM

After Operation Sizzling Pork, I thought it would be a good idea to write down how we had managed to run N1MM in multioperator mode using MacBooks at each operating position. Before those neurons completely evaporate, here’s what I remember:

1. Pull down the latest version of the documentation for N1MM. Flip to the page on “Multi-User Support”. Most of the instructions are the same whether you’re on a PC or a Mac emulating a PC. I’ll only point out the big steps and those that are Mac-specific.

2. Set up the network so all the machines can ping one another (using the OS X terminal).  That is, they should all be on the same LAN and local software firewalls should at least allow responses to pings (ICMP). In our case, the house was connected to cable-provided internet via a Linksys wireless router. From past experience, N1MM does not do well with wireless internet — it uses UDP packets, and perhaps isn’t very tolerant when some drop out due to RF interference. We went with a wired connection to each computer. In fact, in our case, we ran one wire from the router to a dumb hub, and thence to each computer. The topology doesn’t really matter, just as long as there’s no switch between the computers. We went with static ip addresses, avoiding the address range that had already been assigned by DHCP to other computers in the house. For instance, the router, 192.168.1.1 and the bedroom computer addresses 192.168.1.100 were avoided. Looking at the router set up, we also avoided 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.150, as this address range was assignable. We decided to designate our logging stations at 192.168.1.200, 192.168.1.201, and 192.168.1.202.

screen shot of the configuration screen for Parallels 5
Configuring Parallels 5.0

3. Fire up Parallels on each machine. If you have more than one VM defined, select one of the Windows images. Now, click “Configuration”, which should bring up the configuration editor. Click “network adapter”, and then select “Shared Networking” (rather than bridged). After clicking “OK”, hit the green arrow to boot the VM. When it comes up, it will share the same IP address as its host Mac. Next, set up the network configuration for the virtual PC using the same parameters as the Mac. So, for us, we went into TCP/IP properties and set the gateway and DNS to the router’s address (192.168.1.1), and then gave each PC it’s static IP (e.g., 192.168.1.200).

4. Set up the individual virtual computers — as usual, before the contest, download the latest update for N1MM and data files (wl_city.dta and master.dta).

5. Make sure the computers and their respective rigs work right in single user mode. Any port that controls the rig or does something else useful should be enabled as part of Parallels configuration, and the virtual PC should control it.

6. Make a list of operating station number (beginning with zero), the station label, and the static IP address. Use these numbers and names to fill out the table under >config > edit station names. Type them exactly the same on each workstation.

7. Create a new database (*.mdb) on the master station (station zero). Make sure that the entry category is compatible with multiple operating positions. If you put in “single radio”, the other workstations will be locked out while you transmit. Put in all the set-up info for the contest (Name, address, station category, power, grid square, etc.). Close N1mm on the master computer and copy the database file  to the other computers. I suggest using a USB thumb drive.

8.  Bring the computers into multimode operation (>config >multi-user mode). From this point, avoid taking the stations out of multiuser (i.e., don’t uncheck this).

The rest is pretty much the same as with a regular PC. So aside from the steps involving configuration of parallels, using a Mac with N1MM isn’t all that complicated. It could be that slower machines would have problems due to overhead, but our laptops ran WinXP without breaking a sweat. More complicated interfacing could also raise the bar, but as long the connections pass through to the virtual machine, it should be okay. I would note that in our case, we had no problem mixing a PC laptop with a couple Macs, and that the Macs in question had different versions of OS X (Leopard and Snow Leopard), and of Parallels (5.0 and 6.0), none of which seemed to matter.

 

 

Operation Sizzling Pork: The Food

Three team members wearing their maroon OSP team shirts, standing in the parking lot of Squealer's restaurant
'twas the night before INQP...

This has been in my “drafts” pile for a while, awaiting the right photo…

Meals and snacks play an important role in radio contesting. Perhaps not in the ultra-competitive world of international championship radiosport, where contestants gnaw energy bars and live at the edge of dehyration, but certainly in any contest in which I would want to take part. We didn’t stick exactly to the plan for OSP, but we came close.

  • Friday evening, pre-contest: On the way to pick up Ben from Indianapolis Airport, we caught sight of Squealers. The ribs were excellent, but the real discovery was what they do to “biscuits” in Indiana. Somehow, the biscuits they serve taste uncannily like Krispy Kreme donuts, minus the glazing. I’m sure they’re healthy.
  • Saturday morning: Egg sandwiches, yum, plus enough protein to coast through the day. Best served with Tymme’s coffee, 97 octane, and lead-free. So far as we know.
  • Saturday afternoon: Now in the contest, we ate whatever came within arm’s reach. I ingested several salty snacks without really taking the moment to identify them. I think it might have been cheeze doodles and potato chips. If it moved when I grabbed it, I just put it down and kept logging QSOs.
  • Saturday late afternoon: It occurred to us at some point that we were getting hungry, and miraculously, Indian food appeared. There was definitely rice and lentils, and I think some paneer as well, maybe some channa masala. In any event, it was really tasty, and the perfect staple to keep things going. Having spent two years in Bangladesh, the dal-bhat went down without a thought, perfect for maintaining concentration during the contest.
  • Evening: Rates fell off for a while in the early evening, and we all took a break for a bit. Just then, Danyele came in with hot pizza. Impeccable timing. After a couple slices and some beer, we were all ready to tackle the last couple hours of the contest.
  • The Day After: I think we may have had some light food in the early morning, plus coffee, but flight schedules meant that we had to work pretty quickly the morning after the contest. Since taking down antennas is so much faster than putting them up, we had time to spare. We drove into Bloomington, carefully avoiding traffic related to the University’s commencement exercises. Breakfast was served at the traditional RileyCon post-game restaurant, The Runcible Spoon. The bagel and lox was so good, that I thought it must have come from New York.

So, quite a culinary journey, with extreme gratitude to Tymme and Danyele for feeding the troops!

M&M Rounds: FD2011

From my perspective as the captain of the 80/20/10 cw station, field day was a success. We had fun, made contacts, and nothing really went wrong. There’s always room for improvement, though, so looking forward to next year’s event, here are some thoughts…

What worked:

  1. We had a very useful meeting a couple weeks ahead of FD to talk about antennas. We took the general plan laid out by the scouting committee and added some details and enhancements, trying to lock down where all of the supplies would come from, and how we’d go about setting up the station. Most of the people who came to that meeting participated in the setup and operation of the station. A short pre-FD team meeting is something I’d repeat.
  2. We didn’t use inline bandpass filters, but I didn’t hear any complaints about interference, and we barely had any interference, even when we were working 20m at the same time as the SSB station.
  3. Having a mast to support antennas near the station worked out well. The only lesson for next time is to balance the load in all directions so it doesn’t bend like a wet noodle.
  4. Shade. It was a hot day, and being in the shadow of a big tree helped.
  5. Lines in trees. Having the antenna plan in hand, we are able to shoot lines into appropriate trees even before we had all the equipment on hand and enough people to raise the mast.
  6. The headphone breakout box was very helpful. We had at least two sets of headphones plugged in, plus the external speaker so onlookers could see what was going on.
  7. We made use of all keying modes — via computer, paddles, and straight key. All should be enabled in future operations.
  8. We went across the road with antennas. This worked out okay, with the actual crossing accomplished quickly, someone in the road to direct traffic, and someone to climb the tree on the far side to tie the antenna up out of the reach of park users. We managed the tree climbing part, but next year a ladder would be a good idea.
  9. LAN. We were at the very limit of the available CAT5 cable. We had no problems at all with the LAN.
  10. Logistics: We had no problems with parking, toilets, etc. Food was phenomenal.

What didn’t work:

  1. The B2000 is not a great radio for S&P. It lacks a nice big knob. Next time, I’d use the Ten Tec Omni VII as the main station and leave the reserve radio in the car.
  2. Folding chairs. The folding chairs were good, but a bit low relative to the table. I’m not sure what the solution is — lower tables, higher chairs? Also, next time: some lawn chairs so we can stretch out.
  3. Sleeping arrangements. Next time, I’ll bring a separate tent for overnight camping, plus an extra sleeping bag and perhaps an air mattress.
  4. Spotting radio. We had two radios set up, but consistent with operating as a 4A, we used on only for listening. We had hoped to use the receive-only radio for marking the band map to make S&P more effective, but found that by the time we switched bands, many of the stations had disappeared (either QSYd or were lost due to changing propagation conditions).
  5. Beetles. Not sure what to do about them — we may have to live with them.

Lessons learned:

  1. Even when everything is working right, the generator pauses every now and then, for instance, when it refuels. Not a problem for the laptops, but it caught me mid-QSO a couple times. Byron wasn’t affected. Why? Because he had a powergate on his radio, with a back-up battery. Even a small 12V battery can provide enough power to finish the QSO. The other advantage of the powergate is that the battery is charging when it isn’t in use.
  2. A thermos of hot coffee would be a welcome addition.
  3. N1MM: At one point, N1MM refused to key the rig because it saw that another station on the network was calling CQ. This was because the log was set up for “single station”, and was quickly corrected.
  4. The 40/15 cw station was operated primarily by seasoned operators, which is entirely appropriate since it is the workhorse band for cw. Many of the operators of our station operated at lower speed or were not as familiar with contesting. Both in terms of fun and preparation for future contests, this was very worth doing. In strategic terms, though, thought could be given to running a fifth station for those times when another higher speed operator is available. This would be particularly useful during the next few years with higher solar flux, when 10m might be open. For most of the contest, we could have worked both 10m and 20m. The fifth station could also serve as “swing” considering that our antennas also would have worked 40 or 15m. The main constraint would be the number of cw operators.
  5. Bring lots of rope early in the day. A couple long ones, e.g., 300+ feet, a bunch of 200 foot, and the rest can be 100 feet. At a minimum, the tower itself requires four guy ropes, plus additional ropes to haul up each antenna.
  6. Next year, we should put signs outside each tent to identify the station, e.g. “80/20/10m CW tent”.
  7. The tents are big enough to accomodate two tables plus operators. Next year, even if we don’t have a second radio in the tent, we should set up a second table for stuff. This will keep food, drinks, etc., away from the operating position.
  8. It was a hot day. Whoever arrives early should bring some water, as it takes a while for the food/drink area to get set up.
  9. Scheduling. There are a limited number of cw operators, and some operators require a mentor to ride shotgun. We were off the air from 3:30 to about 6:30 am on Saturday morning. Ideally, we would recruit additional operators to provide shorter shifts and reserve someone to cover the early morning hours.
  10. Tags. I’m not sure everyone got back their own ropes and other odds and ends. Chances are that one rope is as good as another, but if we had some self-adhesive tags, we could label stuff as it is unpacked, and be sure that everyone gets their own stuff back.

IARU Worldwide HF Championship 2011

a map of the world divided into ITU zones
ITU zones

The International Amateur Radio Union is a worldwide advocacy organization for amateur radio, and national-level organizations like ARRL are themselves members of the IARU. The union does not make international rules like the ITU, but it does lobby on the international level on behalf of radio amateurs.

Yesterday, I took part in a contest run by the IARU, which was as good a chance as any to hop on the air and start making contacts. The exchange for this contest was very simple: most stations gave their ITU zone. The only exceptions to this were official stations of the IARU itself and its member organizations. American hams are used to listening to transmissions from W1AW, the official station of the ARRL, but in this contest, it was a treat to work W1AW (well, actually the station identified as W1AW/6). Some of the abbreviations for the other member organizations were familiar like RAC (Canada), RSGB (UK), REF (France), and UBA (Belgium), but some were new to me.

Like most contests, I chose to enter this one as cw-only, single operator, low power. This is probably the best category given my limited antenna. Some of the stations were speed demons and required some extra listening to get it right. I have the impression that there were fewer “entry level” operators in this contest.

Propagation was poor during the contest. The SFI was in the mid-80s, and  a high velocity stream from a coronal hole had created unsettled conditions from the beginning of the contest on Saturday morning. I had a couple contacts on 10m, but the band was generally useless. Fifteen was fairly limited, but 20 was strong. During the day time, 40m was useless due to noise, but when 20m faded around 9 pm, 40 cleared up and took the load. I stuck with it until around 1am, making a last pass on 80m.

I had started on Saturday morning, but missed the middle of the day due to the meeting of the NIH amateur radio club and some shopping. Overall, I made 208 contacts and got a reasonable number of multiplier points from the IARU member stations. My list of countries worked included: Austria, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Canary Islands, Colombia, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, England, European Russia, Finland, France,  Germany, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Romania, Serbia, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, Turks & Caicos Islands, Ukraine, USA, Venezuela, and Virgin Islands.

FD2011

A two-wheel trailer with two cross-polarized antennas mounted on an az-el rotor
Not every antenna was as cool as the satellite trailer

For Field Day 2011, the Vienna Wireless Society fielded four HF stations, plus a GOTA, a VHF and a satellite station. As mentioned previously on the blog, planning for the event had started months before, and picked up speed in May. Somewhere along the way, I ended up as captain for the 80/20 cw station, which was quite a learning experience, never having participated in a VWS field day prior to this one.

We had a pow-wow about antennas and rigs a couple nights before the event, but the plan continued to evolve until spud guns started puffing around 2 pm on field day (when antennas were allowed to be erected). The centerpiece in our antenna arrangement was a 40-foot galvanized pole. To the west, an alpha-delta DX-EE was hung between a tree and the pole. To the east, an 80m OCF dipole was hung, with the long end crossing the road and suspended from a high tree. We were able to adjust the tension so those two antennas more or less balanced each other. To the north, we hung a home-made 40/20/15/10 antenna, and about 12 feet behind it on separate lines, we suspended a 20m reflector. Having no antenna to the south, the pole bent a bit towards the north once we got it up.

A mast with many attached wires bends slightly to the north
Our overburdened mast

Raising the pole was an interesting affair, never having done this before. A stake was driven in at the base of the pole. Guy ropes were attached to the next-to-top-most ring. Two to the side of the antenna were set up as pivot points, with a forward and aft halyard as well. Carabiners were looped through the upper most ring to serve as pulleys for the antennas. The 20m reflector was drawn up through a large toroid knotted into the rope suspending the OCF. Consequently, when the whole thing was pulled up, it had about ten ropes hanging off it. Note to self: make sure that all the ends of every rope are either being held or are tied off. As soon as the mast went up, one rope went whizzing through the carabiner and the mast had to be lowered again to rethread it.

We checked each antenna with an analyzer and had to tweak the homebrew multiband, but once we got going, the antennas all worked really well. Mike K3MT started us off with some solar-powered contacts, powering Byron’s Ten Tec Omni VII from a lead acid battery that he had charged earlier. We then ran for quite a while on the Kenwood B2000.

I’m probably leaving out of a few people, but as I recall, quite a few people tried their hands either calling or running on 20m including Sheila and Mel, Hap, Dave, Deapesh, Ray (Albers), Kevin and a ham who was new to the area, Leon.

Hap and Sheila work a contact on cw
Hap logs and Sheila works the straight key on a cw QSO

A couple days before FD, the solar flux was edging into the low hundreds, but there were some low grade solar disturbances. The ionosphere calmed down just in time for field day, and propagation was great. Ten meters was open throughout the afternoon and into the evening. Although the voice stations continued to work 10m into the late evening, I switched to 20m to take advantage of our “2 element beam” westward. While others continued to work 20m, I did a survey of 80m on the Ten Tec, and 80m also sounded good. At some point after midnight, we switched over to 80m and went up and down the band a few times. Deapesh and I wrapped up at 3:30am, but were relieved by Byron and Hap early on Saturday, as they continued to work 80m before the sun was up.

80m faded in mid-morning, and we were back to 20m for the rest of the event. On Saturday, there wasn’t much activity on 10m, and solar flux was already on its way down. Ron came by later in the day and worked as my logger, which was a real luxury. We lined them up and knocked them down in a solid run, which was satisfying.

Tear down went quickly, and I think I ended up with all the right equipment at the end. A few items need to make it back to their owners at the next meeting.

Some photos from Field Day, from… Linda (AC4LT) and Bernie (N4JDF)

Next post: What worked, and what I’d do differently next time for field day.